Category: news

First place

elliottbsj300

Above an image of “Barn and Mist,” which I submitted to this year’s LandMark competition at Arts of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City.  Gimlet-eyed readers will recognize a detail of the same as the main image of this blog.  It took first prize.

Many thanks to Darlene Tighe and Keli Hindenach, the gallery manager and excutive director who put on the event during the approach of the tropical storm and sometime-hurricane Hilene. Likwise to Munroe Bell who beat the storm in time to judge the work.

I have painted this region for almost a decade and have loved it even longer.  It was a delight to be in a room full of people who love it.

The picture is for sale at Arts of the Albemarle.  Call them at 252-338-6455. Armed with this and a few books by Bland Simpson, you’d be all set.  Or as they say in Northeastern North Carolina, you’d be right,  I reckon.

 

 

Row on row

These are rows of grapes at the Addison Farms vineyard, whose owner, Jeff Frisbee has been kind enough to host  Wild Art 2016: the Art Show to Benefit Appalachian Wildlife Refuge on August 6 from 12noon to 5pm.  It all happens at 4005 New Leicester Highway, 15 minutes and a whole world northwest of Asheville, NCafrows

For some annual crops, at least, we shall see the row system, maybe even tillage itself, vanish in our lifetimes.  And good riddance, too.

Perennial crops, though, are another matter.  Since the earliest gardens in the Near East, rows and compass points have predominated.  There is something intrinsically reverent and hopeful about the conjunction of geometry, next year and fruit.

Where these things intersect, you can have a culture, because culture demands that someone see life on the side of order and not chaos.

addison01

The Vineyard.  Walnut ink on prepared paper.

Agriculture, culture, cult: these three perdure.

Vendange

Black walnut ink in Mason jars

Black walnut ink

I am now offering walnut ink for sale.  It has a rich warmth unmatched by other kinds of ink.

Grey Wolf

Grey Wolf.  Reed pen with walnut ink and wash.

I’m working on a full-service web outlet, which will be up and running by December 1st.

If you can’t wait, visit the Ink page on this site to reserve some.  I’ll ship it or you can pick it up.

Wide open: the show

On Thursday, December 4, I’ll show 30-some works in oil and ink at the Chowan Arts Council at 504 S. Broad St. in Edenton.  The show is titled Wide Open and features the overlooked landscapes of North Carolina’s Northeast.  This is a land of forgotten explorers, a four-and-half-century history of visual art, small Indian tribes, and big skies.  Between now and then, I’ll offer previews of some of the works and reflections on the places that inspired them.

The little sketch below grew into a study, a 2 x 3′ rendered drawing, and a painting almost as big.

Bunch's Garage

Bunch’s Garage. China ink. 3 x 6″

Of Time and the River

That’s the eponymous title of the benefit art show for Riverlink, the non-profit that has cleaned up and made accessible the French Broad River near Asheville.  The French Broad is the third oldest river in the world, it flows north, and its beauty has been neatly reduced to little rectangles and hung on walls.

The French Broad River, Hamblen County, Tennessee.

The French Broad River, Hamblen County, Tennessee.

A ticketed event opens the show on October 23rd at Sol’s Retreat, overlooking said river above the New Belgium site. Free public viewing, albeit without live music and bottomless gluttony are available the following two days, 11am-6pm.

Bowen Bridge

The show takes place just uphill from where I’m standing. This is in the flood plain of the French Broad under the Bowen Bridge in West Asheville. Downtown is over my shoulder.

You can sample works by some of the exhibitors here.  Many are my teachers, and I’m pleased to show my work next to theirs.

Of Time and the River

Thus the allusive title of a late October group show for the  benefit of Riverlink, the Asheville non-profit that does so much for the health of the French Broad River.  It will be hosted by Alchemy Fine Art at Walnut and Rankin Streets in downtown Asheville, North Carolina.

The French Broad is narrow, winding and unnavigable for most of its length, and therein lies its charm.  Unlike its better-known and larger brethren such as the Delaware, James and Mississippi, it unites geography but divides people.  You can follow the James along US 60 in Virginia from Hampton Roads to Scottsville in the Blue Ridge Mountains, and the people all along your route speak with the same Tidewater accent.  Centuries of reliable transport has united them.

Try the same thing from the mouth of the French Broad at Knoxville, Tennessee to its source near Rosman, North Carolina, and you’ll have a widely different experience.  You’ll be in the car all day.  You’ll drive on Federal, State and County roads, many of them dirt and gravel.  The sweetness of East Tennessee speech gives way to the sour note of Western North Carolina.  The churches go from Baptist to Pentecostal to Baptist again. And seeing the river will involve walking.

For two hundred and more years, anyone travelling any distance was concerned to get across the French Broad rather than up and down it. It was hard. That goes double for those with baggage, horses or automobiles–or, in my case, an easel, paints and lunch.

The bridge in the oil painting below is a triumph all the more impressive when one recalls that people actually died crossing this river in private ferries as late at the 1940’s. Underneath it settles the graffiti-covered tobacco warehouse in the ink drawing, itself a little monument to works and days now gone, as vice gives way to vice between watery death and sunny achievement.

Bowen Bridge

The Bowen Bridge, carrying I-240 across the hundred-foot wide French Broad River into downtown Asheville–and the large gorge it cuts. I’m in the space dugout to catch floodwater, and the river is behind me over the berm.

Many of the better views of the river are lost to public memory or overlooked.  And that’s a shame.  Degas famously said, “Art isn’t what one sees; it’s what one makes others see.”  Art can make you remember, too; or question a hole in your memory.  The next few posts will feature some of these overlooked places, which are no less beautiful for that.

Visit Riverlink’s website here.  They haven’t forgotten the river.

River District Warehouse, Asheville.  Walnut ink

River District Warehouse, Asheville. Walnut ink

 

 

Art takes wing

Through August, patrons may view and purchase my art at the Asheville Regional Airport.  Now is your chance to take home a piece of North Carolina.

Patrons may purchase art by emailing art@flyavl.com or visiting the Airport’s art page:

http://flyavl.com/pages/passenger-services/in-the-terminal/art-music.php

 

The Trading Post, Edneyville.  8 x 13.5"

The Trading Post, Edneyville. 8 x 13.5″

Tomato 'Costoluto'

Tomato ‘Costoluto.’ 6 x 6″

Sharecropper's House

Sharecropper’s House . 8 x 9″